PoliticalEssays

September 28, 2007

Why Bu$h Hates Castro

Filed under: The Superpower — jaspar @ 10:12 am
Tags:

Why Bu$h Hates Castro

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Friday September 28, 2007
POLITICAL ESSAYS
Why Bu$h Hates Castro
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From Castro's speech to the Honorable Judges in 1953:
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Batista isn't concerned with taking care of the Army, but that 
the Army take care of him!
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He increases the Army's power of oppression and killing but
does not improve living conditions for the soldiers.  Triple
guard duty, constant confinement to barracks, continuous an-
xiety, the enmity of the people, uncertainty about the future
--this is what has been given to the soldier.
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In other words: 'Die for the regime, soldier, give it your
sweat and blood.  We shall dedicate a speech to you and award
you a posthumous promotion (when it no longer matters) and
afterwards...we shall go on living luxuriously, making our-
selves rich
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Kill, abuse, oppress the people.  When the people get tired
and all this comes to an end, you [the soldiers] can pay for
our crimes while we go abroad and live like kings.  And if
one day we return, don't you or your children knock on the
doors of our mansions, for we shall be millionaires and mil-
lionaires do not mingle with the poor.
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Kill, soldier, oppress the people, die for the regime, give
your sweat and blood...' 
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But if blind to this sad truth, a minority of soldiers had
decided to fight the people, the people who were going to
liberate them from tyranny, victory still would have gone to
the people.
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The Honorable Prosecutor was very interested in knowing our
chances for success. These chances were based on considera-
tions of technical, military and social order. 
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They have tried to establish the myth that modern arms render
the people helpless in overthrowing tyrants.  Military parades 
and the pompous display of machines of war are used to perpe-
tuate this myth and to create a complex of absolute impotence
in the people.
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But no weaponry, no violence can vanquish the people once they
are determined to win back their rights.  Both past and pre-
sent are full of examples.  The most recent is the revolt in
Bolivia, where miners with dynamite sticks smashed and defeat-
ed regular army regiments. 
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Fortunately, we Cubans need not look for examples abroad.  No
example is as inspiring as that of our own land.
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During the war of 1895 there were nearly half a million armed
Spanish soldiers in Cuba, many more than the Dictator [Batis-
ta] counts upon today to hold back a population five times
greater.
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The arms of the Spaniards were, incomparably, both more up to
date and more powerful than those of our mambises [= guerrilla
fighters].  Often the Spaniards were equipped with field ar-
tillery and the infantry used breechloaders similar to those
still in use by the infantry of today.  The Cubans were usual-
ly armed with no more than their machetes, for their cartridge
belts were almost always empty.

There is an unforgettable passage in the history of our War of
Independence, narrated by General Miró Argenter, Chief of An-
tonio Maceo's General Staff.  I managed to bring it copied on
this scrap of paper so I wouldn't have to depend upon my me-
mory: 
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"Untrained men under the command of Pedro Delgado, most of
them equipped only with machetes, were virtually annihilated
as they threw themselves on the solid rank of Spaniards.  It
is not an exaggeration to assert that of every fifty men, 25
were killed.  Some even attacked the Spaniards with their
bare fists, without machetes, without even knives.  Searching
through the reeds by the Hondo River, we found fifteen more
dead from the Cuban party, and it was not immediately clear
what group they belonged to.  They did not appear to have
shouldered arms, their clothes were intact and only tin drink-
ing cups hung from their waists; a few steps further on lay
the dead horse, all its equipment in order.
`
We reconstructed the climax of the tragedy.  These men, fol-
lowing their daring chief, Lieutenant Colonel Pedro Delgado,
had earned heroes' laurels: they had thrown themselves against
bayonets with bare hands, the clash of metal which was heard
around them was the sound of their drinking cups banging
against the saddlehorn.

Maceo was deeply moved.  This man so used to seeing death in
all its forms murmured this praise: 'I had never seen anything
like this, untrained and unarmed men attacking the Spaniards
with only drinking cups for weapons.  And I called it [= the
cups] impedimenta!'"
 
This is how peoples fight when they want to win their freedom;
they throw stones at airplanes and overturn tanks! 
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Castro
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Newsstories of interest:
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Oreo
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September 16, 2007

It’s Their Fault, Their Fault, Their Fault

Filed under: The Superpower — jaspar @ 7:56 am

It’s Their Fault, Their Fault, Their Fault

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Friday September 14, 2007
POLITICAL ESSAYS
It's Their Fault, Their Fault, Their Fault
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A Lieutenant Colonel complains about the new Field Manual on
Counterinsurgency.
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One of his points:
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"Because soldiers need tactical success to guarantee the main-
tenance of their morale and offensive spirit,
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and because tactical success in Iraq --killing the bona fide
enemy-- is so elusive,
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the idea of torture in the minds of combat soldiers fills a
void, psychologically, in their desire to regain the initia-
tive."
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It's NOT their fault, NOT their fault, NOT their fault.
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A retired Army officer explains why the Iraqi Resistance is
so elusive.
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One of his points:
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"...innovative approaches to fielding combatant forces...have
posed unexpectedly solution-resisitant challenges to English-
speaking militaries, as well as to the Israeli Defense Force."
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It's *Their* Fault, *Their* Fault, *Their* Fault.
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As for torture, it's like Le Pen says about the Holocaust:
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It's a (d)(e)(t)(a)(i)(l).
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`
`

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Eating soup with a spoon.  Missing from the new COIN manual's
pages is the imperative to fight
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Soup
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When Muslim armies won.  Lessons from yesteryear's jihadi vic-
tories
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Won
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Newsstories of interest at:
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Oreo
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September 8, 2007

Back, Back, Way Back

Filed under: The Superpower — jaspar @ 11:01 am

Back, Back, Way Back

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Friday September 7, 2007
POLITICAL ESSAYS
Back, Back, Way Back
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A WHILE AGO
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[Ulysses fought at Troy.  After Troy's defeat, Ulysses wished
to return home but, for 20 years, was prevented from doing so.
At last, he is able to return home --in disguise.
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He finds (a) his wife Penelope has remained faithful, (b) a
bunch of no-goods has been after her to marry one of them.
`
These no-goods claim they are waiting for her to decide which
one.  Meanwhile, they are eating and drinking Ulysses' estate
to ruin.
`
Ulysses, after seeing how matters stand, throws off his dis-
guise.  He and his now-grown-up son Telemachus arm themselves.
The swineheard Eumaeus and the stockman Philoetius stand with
them.
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The no-goods are, at that very moment, not armed.
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A traitor, the goatherd Melanthius, brings their arms to them
from the storeroom.]
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"But I know what I will do, I will bring you arms from the
store room, for I am sure it is there that Ulysses and his
son have put them."
`
On this the goatherd Melanthius went by back passages to the
store room of Ulysses' house.  There he chose twelve shields,
with as many helmets and spears, and brought them back as
fast as he could to give them to the suitors.  Ulysses' heart
began to fail him when he saw the suitors putting on their
armour and brandishing their spears.
`
He saw the greatness of the danger, and said to Telemachus,
"Some one of the [servant] women inside is helping the suit-
ors against us, or it may be Melanthius." 
`
Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine
only; I left the store room door open, and they have kept a
sharper look out than I have.  Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, 
and see whether it is one of the women who is doing this, or
whether, as I suspect, it is Melanthius the son of Dolius." 
`
Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Melanthius was again going
to the store room to fetch more armour, but the swineherd
saw him and said to Ulysses who was beside him, "Ulysses,
noble son of Laertes, it is that scoundrel Melanthius, just
as we suspected, who is going to the store room.  Say, shall
I kill him, if I can get the better of him, or shall I bring
him here that you may take your own revenge for all the many
wrongs that he has done in your house?"
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Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors
in check, no matter what they do; go back both of you and
bind Melanthius' hands and feet behind him.  Throw him into
the store room and make the door fast behind you; then fasten
a noose about his body, and string him close up to the rafters
from a high bearing-post, that he may linger on in an agony." 
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Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said; they went
to the store room, which they entered before Melanthius saw
them, for he was busy searching for arms in the innermost part
of the room, so the two took their stand on either side of the
door and waited.
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By and by Melanthius came out with a helmet in one hand, and
an old dry-rotted shield in the other, which had been borne
by Laertes when he was young, but which had been long since
thrown aside, and the straps had become unsewn; on this the
two seized him, dragged him back by the hair, and threw him
struggling to the ground.  They bent his hands and feet well
behind his back, and bound them tight with a painful bond as
Ulysses had told them; then they fastened a noose about his
body and strung him up from a high pillar till he was close
up to the rafters, and over him did you then vaunt, O swine-
herd Eumaeus, saying, "Melanthius, you will pass the night
on a soft bed as you deserve.  You will know very well when
morning comes from the streams of Oceanus, and it is time
for you to be driving in your goats for the suitors to feast
on." 
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There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having
put on their armour they closed the door behind them and went
back to take their places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the
four men stood in the cloister, fierce and full of fury; ne-
vertheless, those [the no-goods] who were in the body of the
court were still both brave and many.
-
-
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Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd of suitors.
Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and Eumaeus Po-
lybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast....
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...Ulysses struck the son of Damastor with a spear in close
fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenor in the
belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fell
forward full on his face upon the ground.
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Then Minerva from her seat [as a dove] on the rafter held up
her deadly aegis, and the hearts of the suitors quailed.
`
They fled to the other end of the court like a herd of cattle
maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days are at
their longest.
`
As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from the mountains
swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks upon the
ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly,
and lookers-on enjoy the sport --even so did Ulysses and his
men fall upon the suitors and smite them on every side.  They
made a horrible groaning as their brains were being battered
in, and the ground seethed with their blood.
-
[That task having been accomplished...]
-
As for Melanthius, they took him through the cloister into
the inner court.
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There they cut off his nose and his ears; they drew out his
vitals and gave them to the dogs raw, and then in their fury
they cut off his hands and his feet. 
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LATELY NOW
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Salah ad-Din Province
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At-Tarimiyah.
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US forces raid area around at-Tarimiyah killing six civilians
and mutilating their bodies.
` 
In a dispatch posted at 10:55am Baghdad time Thursday morning,
the Association of Muslim Scholars of Iraq (AMSI) reported
that US troops carried out an airborne landing in the village
of ash-Shabab in the al-‘Abayiji area of at-Tarimiyah, about
30km north of Baghdad on Wednesday.
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The AMSI reported eyewitnesses as saying that the Americans
killed five villagers in the raid and then mutilated their
bodies.
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The witnesses added that the Americans then killed another
youth in at-Tarimiyah and cut off his limbs.  It appeared that
those Americans were implementing some kind of policy that in-
volved systematic mutilation of their victims.
` 
US forces have been carrying out numerous attacks on villagers
to the north of Baghdad.  They have also recently abducted a
woman from at-Tarimiyah after imprisoning another woman from
ad-Dulu‘iyah, about 90km north of Baghdad.
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BACK, BACK, WAY BACK!
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A WHILE AGO
`
The Odyssey (the whole thing):
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Odyssey1
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or
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The Odyssey (Book XXII only):
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Odyssey2
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LATELY NOW
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Iraqi Resistance Report for events of Thursday, 6 September
2007 (next to last item):
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Resistance
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September 4, 2007

The Con Artist – Part 5

Filed under: Uncategorized — jaspar @ 6:52 am

The Con Artist – Part 5

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Monday September 3, 2007
POLITICAL ESSAYS
The Con Artist - Part 5
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Under the September 2d headline "[Russian Federation] Presi-
dent Reassuring About Stock Market," Kommersant quotes Putin:
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"For us, it wasn't such a critical fall, but more like a cor-
rection with regard to the previous unprecedented growth...."
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Under the August 31st headline "Foreign Debt Weighing on VTB,"
Moscow Times reports:
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"[The brokerage firm] Troika Dialog...voiced fears that VTB,
the country's second-largest bank, would be hard hit by the
higher costs of refinancing [= rolling over] its debt amid
the global credit crunch."
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How's that?
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The Times quotes a brokerage banking analyst:
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"The bank has far greater exposure to wholesale funding."
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Wholesale funding?  Wholesale borrowing as contrasted with
retail borrowing.
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Retail borrowing?  When ordinary people deposit money in a
bank, they imagine it's something only *they* are doing.
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But once the bank's got that money it looks at things from
*its* point of view: it pays a small bribe to those deposi-
tors so they'll leave that money in the bank.  That bribe
is called interest.
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However, the bank knows that sooner or later some of these
ordinary people will withdraw all or part of their money.
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The bank perceives that its bribe is no guarantee, and that
the deposits are only borrowings by the bank.
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So the bank quickly lends out most of its borrowings to those
who gotta have green.  Those folks will have to pay a higher
interest rate on *their* borrowing.
`
What happens when total retail deposits decline (as they have
over the years) while demand for loans keeps shooting up?
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Banks go for all kinds of wholesale borrowing.
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As the Comptroller of the Currency told the Senate Banking
Committee in 2001:
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"In response to the long-run, secular trend of slower deposit
growth, banks have turned increasingly to higher interest rate
wholesale funding."
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In The Superpower, how's that done?
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"While large banks are accustomed to accessing the capital
markets for funding, this is a new activity for many smaller
banks.
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Because of costs and [con game] information constraints, small
banks find it more difficult than large banks to raise funds
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through public debt offerings [stocks, bonds],
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securitizations [good and bad securities wrapped together],
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and other [structured finance] capital market instruments.
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Thus, we see that small banks are increasingly relying on
wholesale providers such as the Federal Home Loan Banks as
well as deposits obtained through the Internet or CD [Certi-
ficate of Deposit] listing services."
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Back to VTB--
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"More than 30 percent of VTB's liabilities are made up of
foreign debt and syndicated loans [from listing services],
Troika said...."
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"This compares to just 5 percent at state-controlled Sberbank,
the country's largest bank."
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It's interesting that VTB "raised $8 billion through the sale
of 22.5 percent of its stock in May [this year]...."
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It's really going to town.  Or to hell.
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By the way, is it borrowing from The Superpower?
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Better look into that, Vladimir Vladimirovich.
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Kommersant:
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Komm
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Moscow Times:
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MosT
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Comtroller:
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Com
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The Con Artist - Part 4:
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Essay1
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The Exchange:
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Essay2
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September 1, 2007

The Con Artist – Part 4

Filed under: The Superpower — jaspar @ 11:26 am

The Con Artist – Part 4

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Friday August 31, 2007
POLITICAL ESSAYS
The Con Artist - Part 4
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`
Under the August 31st headline "Why A U.S. Subprime Mortgage
Crisis Is Felt Around the World," the NY Times quotes First
State's deputy head of Asia-Pacific equities:
`
"Liquidity can just be turned off, and essentially it is a
confidence game."
`
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Under the same-date headline "Stocks Rise After Bush, Bernan-
ke Speak," AP reports "Wall Street closed out another erratic
week with a big gain Friday after investors took comments from
...Bush and...Bernanke as reassuring signs...."
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AP quotes Church Capital Management's portfolio manager:
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"You've got all the speeches working for the market here."
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Imagination says liquidity can be turned on with a word or two.
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After all imagination is essentially a confidence game.
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But not all play that game.
`
Back to the Times news analysis--
`
"Foreign politicians and regulators are seeking a role in the
oversight of American markets, banks and rating agencies."
`
For instance:
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"The head of the Council of Economic Analysis in France has
called for complex securities to be scrutinized before banks
are authorized to buy them."
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But that flies in the face of one of the principal clauses
of The Superpower's Declaration of World $lavery:
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THERE SHALL BE NO TRUTH EVER AGAIN, ANYWHERE !
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Imagine that.
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NYT:
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NYT
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AP:
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AP
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The Con Artist essays:
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Essay1
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Essay2
`
Essay3
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The Exchange essay:
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Essay4
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